Three parent IVF: should we be scared?

The media have termed the use of cytoplasmic material from another party in In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), Three Parent IVF. The rationale for using cytoplasmic material from a third party (egg) is to obtain the mitochondria. Some Intended Parents cannot have children or want to have children due to inherited mitochondrial diseases. This technique brings hope to those Intended Parents with mitochondrial diseases. The topic is not new, it is only getting new media and public attention. Some media reports on the topic make it sound scary, or ethically incorrect and akin to genetic engineering. The New York Times has.
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No link between fertility drugs and breast, ovarian and uterine cancers

Many women undergoing fertility treatments have concern that these extra doses of hormones might set the stage for future health risks such as cancer.   Results of a 30-year study addressing this very topic were presented at the annual meeting of the the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.  Study authors reported There is “little evidence” that the use of conventional fertility hormones used for ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility increases the long-term risk of breast and gynecological cancers, according to the results of a substantial 30-year follow-up study. Omega Family Global´s Dr. Kramer says the results are reassuring and.
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Coming to america – for a surrogate and a baby

This past three-day long weekend the New York Times posted an interesting article  regarding couples coming to the US in order to create their family via surrogacy.  It touches on how far this industry has come over the last decade – with California notably being the best place in the country (and the world) to do surrogacy.   Omega Family Global knows this story well, as many of it´s clients are from outside the United States. Quote from Article: The restrictions in many countries have been a boost for American surrogacy. For overseas couples, the big draw is the knowledge that.
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European human rights court orders france to recognise surrogate-mother children

Two French couples that had children via surrogates in the United States challenged the French government that refused to recognize the French citizenship of the children.    The couples took their case to The European Court of Human Rights and won victory (July 9, 2014). Omega Family Global´s Director of Client Relations, Allie Salinas, had this to say about the news “Omega Family Global has been very lucky in that the steps we have taken to help our French clients have resulted in the successful registration of their children.  However, we understand the struggles of the couples in the article as.
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Calif. health insurers must cover fertility treatments for gay couples

This is a fascinating story  with a potentially huge impact for same sex couples in California entitled Calif. Health Insurers Must Cover Fertility Treatments for Gay Couples. Here is a link to the law itself. (AB460.pdf) The costs associated with fertility treatments has long been a barrier to folks desiring to start a family. This should help enable more people to start their families that were previously unable to do so due to financial reasons.
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Obama urges congress to ban job bias against gays

Today President Obama called on Congress to ban job discrimination against gay Americans as he signed an executive order doing so for workers of federal contractors.  The President took the opportunity point out that Congress has debated such legislation for decades without agreeing to it, and he implored his supporters to raise the temperature on lawmakers even as they have achieved great momentum in the drive to legalize same-sex marriage through much of the nation.  The story can be viewed here (New York Times). According to Omega Family Global´s Chief Counsel, Frederick Gaston, this is a move in the right direction..
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IVF possibly even safer with use of kisspeptin

Results of a recent study using Kisspeptin, instead of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), have shown success in stimulating oocyte (egg) development in women undergoing fertility treatment.  The potential advantage of this new hormonal treatment is that a small number of women (1-2%) treated with hCG experience ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome which in rare cases can be fatal. The relatively small study was conducted by researchers from Imperial College London and Hammersmith Hospital, and was funded by the Medical Research Council, Welcome Trust and National Institute for Health Research. The study was published in The study was published in The Journal of.
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New technique for selecting stronger embryos

Fertility clinics often transfer two or more embryos into the uterus of a surrogate or intended mother with the hope that at least one will implant and turn into a viable pregnancy. This practice can also be cost effective, reducing the potential need for additional costly and painful procedures. Though there are benefits to transferring multiple embryos, if two or more implant, often times some difficult choices must be made.  There are risks associated with carrying multiple fetuses. In some situations, physicians and intended parents decide to undergo selective reduction of one or more fetuses due to health risks to the pregnant woman, or the remaining.
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Regulators mull safety concerns over three party ivf

Mitochondria are cellular organelles responsible for producing energy.  They contain a circular piece of DNA, and are inherited only from the mother.  Some people have diseases of the mitochondria.  For this reason, three-party IVF has been proposed where the intended parents use an egg (oocyte), minus the nucleus, from another woman to avoid transferring mitochondrial diseases.  The procedure is termed mitochondrial replacement (MR). Some research in animals suggested the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA communicate, and this communication is paring specific, and important for proper gene expression.  Furthermore, evolutionary theory predicts that mismatching between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can have serious.
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Researchers find new fertility drug more effective than the standard used for past 40 years

Researchers from seven different academic centers recruited 750 couples undergoing fertility treatment to compare the long-used fertility drug clomiphene citrate, commonly called Clomid (the standard for 40 years), to Letrozole, a drug initially developed to prevent recurrence of breast cancer in women.  Their results were recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Clomid was given to 376 women and 72 became pregnant and gave birth.  Letrozole was given to 374 women and 103 gave birth.   The results revealed another desirable endpoint in that Letrozole treatment resulted in fewer twins. The frequency of twins was approximately 10% in those treated.
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